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Key Financial Ratios for Stock Analysis



➢ Introduction


Stock analysis is a crucial part of investing in the Indian stock market. Investors aim to make informed decisions that can yield profitable results. One of the most effective methods for evaluating the performance and potential of a company's stock is through the use of financial ratios. These ratios provide valuable insights into a company's financial health and stability. In this comprehensive guide, we will delve into the key financial ratios used for stock analysis in the context of the Indian stock market.


➢ Understanding Financial Ratios


★ What are Financial Ratios?

Financial ratios are quantitative tools that allow investors to assess a company's financial performance and health. They are calculated by dividing one financial metric by another to provide a clearer picture of a company's profitability, liquidity, solvency, and efficiency.


★ Importance of Financial Ratios

Understanding why financial ratios are crucial is essential. This section will highlight the significance of financial ratios in stock analysis, helping investors make more informed decisions.



★ Categories of Financial Ratios


➢ Liquidity Ratios


Current Ratio: The current ratio is a measure of a company's short-term liquidity and its ability to cover immediate obligations. It is calculated by dividing current assets by current liabilities. Current assets include cash, accounts receivable, and inventory, while current liabilities encompass short-term debts and payable.


Example: If a company has current assets of ₹100,000 and current liabilities of ₹50,000, its current ratio would be 2:1, indicating that it has twice as many assets as liabilities to meet short-term obligations.


Quick Ratio: The quick ratio is a more stringent measure of a company's short-term liquidity, excluding inventory from current assets. It provides a clearer picture of a company's ability to meet immediate financial obligations, excluding inventory

that may not be readily converted to cash.


Example: If a company's current assets (excluding inventory) are ₹60,000, and current liabilities are ₹30,000, the quick ratio would be 2:1, showing that the company can cover its short-term liabilities comfortably without relying on selling inventory.


➢ Profitability Ratios


Gross Profit Margin: This ratio indicates how efficiently a company generates profit from its core operations after accounting for the cost of goods sold (COGS). It is calculated by dividing gross profit by total revenue.


Example: If a company has a gross profit of ₹40,000 and total revenue of ₹100,000, the gross profit margin would be 40%, demonstrating that 40% of the company's revenue remains after covering the costs associated with production.


Operating Profit Margin: This ratio measures a company's operating efficiency by assessing how much profit it generates from its regular operations. It's calculated by dividing operating profit by total revenue.


Example: If a company's operating profit is ₹30,000 and total revenue is ₹90,000, the operating profit margin would be 33.33%, indicating that the company retains about 33.33% of its revenue as profit after accounting for operating expenses.


Net Profit Margin: The net profit margin shows how much profit a company retains after all expenses, including taxes and interest. It's calculated by dividing net profit by total revenue.


Example: If a company's net profit is ₹20,000, and total revenue is ₹80,000, the net profit margin would be 25%, indicating that the company keeps 25% of its revenue as profit after all expenses are accounted for.


Return on Equity (ROE): ROE measures a company's profitability relative to shareholders equity. It is calculated by dividing net income by shareholders equity.


Example: If a company's net income is ₹50,000, and shareholders equity is ₹250,000, the ROE

would be 20%, showing that for every ₹1 of shareholders equity, the company generates a 20%

return.


Return on Capital Employed (ROCE): Assesses a company's efficiency in generating profits from its total capital, combining equity and debt.


Example: If a company has ₹100,000 in EBIT and ₹500,000 as capital employed (equity and long-term debt), the ROCE would be 20%. This means the company earns a 20% return on its capital. A higher ROCE suggests better capital efficiency.


➢ Efficiency Ratios


Inventory Turnover: Inventory turnover measures how quickly a company sells its inventory during a specific period. It is calculated by dividing the cost of goods sold (COGS) by the average inventory.


Example: If a company's COGS is ₹200,000, and the average inventory during the year is ₹50,000, the inventory turnover would be 4, indicating that the company sells its inventory four times in a year.


Receivables Turnover: This ratio assesses how efficiently a company collects payments from its customers. It is calculated by dividing total revenue by the average accounts receivable.


Example: If a company's total revenue is ₹400,000, and the average accounts receivable is ₹100,000, the receivables turnover would be 4, demonstrating that the company collects payments from customers four times a year.


Asset Turnover: Asset turnover evaluates how efficiently a company uses its assets to generate revenue. It is calculated by dividing total revenue by total assets.


Example: If a company's total revenue is ₹600,000, and its total assets are ₹300,000, the asset turnover would be 2, indicating that the company generates ₹2 in revenue for every ₹1 of assets.


➢ Solvency(Leverage) Ratios


Debt to Equity Ratio: The debt to equity ratio evaluates a company's financial

leverage and its ability to meet its long-term obligations. It is calculated by dividing

total debt by shareholders equity.


Example: If a company's total debt is ₹100,000, and shareholders equity is ₹200,000, the debt to equity ratio would be 0.5, showing that the company has 50 cents in debt for every ₹1 of equity.


Interest Coverage Ratio: This ratio measures a company's ability to meet its interest expenses using its earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT). It is calculated by dividing EBIT by interest expenses.


Example: If a company's EBIT is ₹60,000, and its interest expenses are ₹10,000, the interest coverage ratio would be 6, indicating that the company can cover its interest expenses six times using its earnings.


These key financial ratios offer valuable insights into a company's financial health, performance, and efficiency. Investors use them to make informed decisions when assessing potential investments in the Indian stock market.

➢ Conclusion


In conclusion, understanding and effectively utilizing key financial ratios is essential for informed stock analysis in the Indian market. These ratios offer insights into a company's financial health, profitability, and efficiency, aiding investors in making wise decisions. Mastering these tools empowers investors to navigate the stock market with confidence.

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